Michael Vick was Wrongly Convicted!

Posted in Michael Vick with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 2, 2011 by chrisdurant2000

Michael Vick was Wrongly Convicted!

Since this past Monday and more specifically for the majority of the Philadelphia Eagles sensational season, I have heard so many people touting Michael Vick. Oh yeah, “Michael Vick has really turned it around, “ etc.

And now, Barrack Obama, the President of the United States, the de facto leader of the Free World, thought it would be a good idea to chirp in and toss a little praise his way as well by taking the time to make a phone call (while on vacation in Hawaii) to the owner of the Eagles and commend him for giving Vick a 2nd chance.

REALLY!?!?

(Here’s your class act role model Mr. President)

I think anyone who thinks that Michael Vick has paid his debt and is a reformed individual needs to take a little walk down memory lane and remind themselves just what this so-called man was engaged in and willfully perpetrated.

Here are the facts:

* Michael Vick was a REGISTERED dog breeder.
* April 24, 2007: Michael Vick’s cousin, Davon Boddie, was arrested in Hampton, Va., on drug charges, leading police to obtain a warrant to search his home (owned by Vick) for other drugs and paraphernalia.
* April 25, 2007: While serving the search warrant, police discovered evidence of an alleged dogfighting operation, including rape stands, pry bars, treadmills modified for dog training, and a blood-stained carpet. Animal-control officers also removed 66 dogs from the property, 55 of which were pit bulls.
* Vick and his co-defendants began the dogfighting operation in early 2001.
* Fights staged on the Surry County premises had purses of as much as $20,000 or more at times.
* The formation of Bad Newz Kennels and testing of the dogs began in early 2002. According to the indictment, one of the dogs did not fight well and was shot to death with a .22 caliber pistol.
* In March 2003, after a pit bull from Bad Newz Kennels lost in a fight, it was executed by wetting it with water and electrocuting it.
* In April 2007, approximately eight dogs that did not perform well in testing were killed by “hanging, drowning, and slamming at least one dog’s body to the ground.”

Here is what Virginia law provides in terms of sentencing for animal cruelty related crimes:


In Virginia, a first offense that does not result in the death of an animal is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which carries a sentence of twelve months or less and a fine of up to $2500 or both. A person committing a second offense, or if the animal dies as a result of the first offense, is guilty of a Class 6 felony, punishable by up to five years in prison or, in the alternative, a prison sentence of less than a year or a maximum fine of $2500 or both. In addition, the owner of a dog or cat injured or killed as a result of cruelty is entitled to a damage award for the value of the animal or the damage done.

Just so we’re clear, Michael Vick was sentenced to 23 months and served 18. Hmm. Now, I am no math wizard, but that seems quite short of the potential maximum. Oh, and he did have to pay a $5,000 fine and another $100 in administration fees.

Why, you ask? Because Michael Vick was not convicted according the Virginia Animal Cruelty laws. Instead he was indicted in Federal Court and pled guilty to one (1), I repeat, one count of “Conspiracy to Travel in Interstate Commerce in Aid of Unlawful Activities and to Sponsor a Dog in an Animal Fight Venture”. An offense that carries a two to five year sentence. I am going to say this again because it’s important: ‘Vick was sentenced to 23 months and served 18 months’. Again, not quite two years and certainly short of the five year maximum sentence. But again, this is only for one count or offense. So no Mr. President, Michael Vick has NOT paid his debt to society. But, then again, your Secretary of the Treasury is an admitted tax evader. It must be nice to view right and wrong from your perspective.

One count. This is unbelievable. Between 2001 and 2007 Michael Vick sponsored dogs in eleven fights. Additionally, he traveled to four states to purchase eleven dogs. Again, could this not be construed as 22 counts? Even with Vick’s meager sentencing this would have equated to 396 months or 33 YEARS!! And even at an absolute minimum, why was he not charged with four counts of the incredibly weak “Conspiracy…”?

But better yet, if he had been truly tried according to Virginia’s Animal Cruelty Laws he could have been tried for twenty dog fights and nine executions. SIXTY FIVE YEARS! Instead, he was again allowed to plead out (while serving out his Federal sentence) to ONE count of dog fighting (the single Animal Cruelty charge was dropped as a part of the plea agreement) and received a three year suspended sentence for time served on the Federal charges. The prosecutor (Virginia’s Surry County Commonwealth Attorney General – Gerald G. Poindexter) didn’t feel that the costs associated with transporting Vick to Virginia from Leavenworth penitentiary in Kansas was worth it. There was also another $2,500 fine which was suspended as well. Nice job, Poindexter. I am sure the good people of Surry County think you’re a real legal eagle, huh?

Some more of Chris’ great math – If Surry County had actually tried Vick they could have charged him with those 29 offenses and reaped $72,500 in fines. Another area I am not an expert in, is travel logistics, but I cannot imagine it would come any where near $72,500 to transport Vick the 1,160 miles (I Google Mapped it) – I mean, that’s $62.50 a mile!? They could have fueled an Abrams M1 armored tank (probably one of the world’s worst gas efficient vehicles) for the entire trip for a mere $3,420.

Another side note: Five of the surviving dogs rescued from Vick’s compound had to be put down. He was not held accountable for those either. But, according to Virginia law, he absolutely should have been. That would have brought the potential charge count up to 34 and another $12,500 for Mr. Poindexter’s ridiculous transportation fund.

Many of you may think I am taking the far extreme position, and I am. Let me point out a few things that should sicken even the hardest of you that may be reading this. First, as if dog fighting isn’t vicious enough, the animals that did not meet Vick and Co. standards or lost their fights were executed. Now I do not mean that they were euthanized by a simple and clean (or slightly humane) method. No, these dogs were sadistically tortured and killed (at times by Vick’s own hands) using methods that required even a slight degree of premeditation and a strong degree of sociopathology – malice and forethought: HANGING, DROWNING, ELECTROCUTING, BLUDGEONED WITH A SHOVEL, SLAMMING THEM TO THE GROUND, et al. That kind of emotional detachment is truly frightening. If Vick and the others associated with Bad NewZ Kennels had done to humans what they did to these dogs, they would be mentioned in the same breath with Dahmer, Gacey, Manson, BTK and other notorious serial killers.

Vick is reported as having experienced an adrenaline rush and euphoric like high from his participation in this savagery.

Innocent Victim

Here’s a little tidbit for you:

“The FBI considers animal cruelty a predictor for violence and continued violent behavior… and is a considered factor when profiling serial killers.”

Nice, huh?

And if you can still overlook the glaring brutality committed by and on behalf of this man, then you seriously need to get your football shaped head out of your ass and consider the situation without Vick. Vick is just a man, he is not a football god, and he is not the savior of the Philadelphia Eagles, the NFL or the sport as a whole. There are hundreds of quarterbacks between the current NFL rosters and those in the many colleges and universities around our country. Most may not have the talent level of Vick, but fortunately (to the best of our knowledge) they don’t have the violent pathology either.

As ridiculous as this is, even the Humane Society of the United States is jumping on the Vick bandwagon and is considering sponsoring Michael Vick to adopt a puppy. Vick is reported as saying it would:

“…be a big step in the rehabilitation process. I think just to have a pet in my household and to show people that I genuinely care, and my love and my passion for animals; I think it would be outstanding. If I ever have the opportunity again I will never take it for granted,” Vick told NBC, “I miss having a dog right now. I wish I could.”

There should be a massive public outcry calling for the immediate and unconditional resignation or simple termination of HSUS CEO Wayne Pacelle. This is an outrage. I seriously hope that anyone who previously gave or is thinking about giving to the HSUS will better spend their money supporting the law enforcing ASPCA or even better their local shelter.

“Junkies want drugs and pedophiles want children.” It doesn’t mean we give them to them. Vick is no different. Vick’s sentencing prohibited him from owning a dog until 2012. This man should never be allowed to own a dog. Let him explain to his girls what daddy did and why they cannot have that cute little puppy and live with the full weight of his actions.

For whatever reason [read: greed] Vick has been afforded a great opportunity for a second chance at his life. But if he were just a regular Joe convicted of these or even far lesser offenses the President would not be so quick to applaud his second chance.
It is truly a shame that our current legal system does not provide stricter punishment for offenses like this. We tend to “rehabilitate” through lenient sentencing, counseling and half-hearted community service.

Here is a final parting image for you: (From The Lost Dogs by Jim Gorant, senior editor of Sports Illustrated)

“As that dog lay on the ground, fighting for air, Quanis Phillips grabbed its front legs and Michael Vick grabbed its back legs. They swung the dog over their head like a jump rope then slammed it to the ground. The first impact didn’t kill it. So, Phillips and Vick slammed it again. The two men kept at it, alternating back and forth, pounding the creature against the ground until, at last, the little red dog was dead.”

Michael Vick, you and your fans (including the POTUS, Surry County Commonwealth Attorney General – Gerald Poindexter, Eagles Owner – Jeffrey Lurie, and HSUS CEO – Wayne Pacelle) make me sick.

Most Sincerely,

Chris Durant

SOURCE DOCUMENTS (Court Docs):
1. Department of Agriculture Investigative Interview
2. Vick Federal Indictment
3. Vick Federal Case Statement of the Facts
4. Vick Federal Plea Agreement
5. Vick Federal Probation
6. Vick Federal Sentencing (slow loading and hard to read)
7. Vick Motion to Enter Plea (in VA) via Video Conference
8. Vick Virginia Plea Agreement

*** please feel free to link to this post or copy it’s contents to your page. ***

 

THANKS FOR READING.

Other Great Stories about Vick’s Dogs –

PETITION: To Remove Wayne Pacelle as CEO of HSUS
“Through Her Eyes” – Virginia’s tale
Michael Vick Deserves a Pet… A “Pet Rock” Join the movement to send HSUS CEO Wayne Pacelle Pet Rocks for Michael Vick to adopt.
Position on Vick from Former Director of Vick Dog Rehabilitation
Tell President Obama You Don’t Agree with him Supporting Vick
Vick’s Unpaid Dues – Why Dog Advocates aren’t moving on
Critter Comments
People for the Ethical Treatment of Pit Bulls

Join Chris Durant on Facebook

Join the “NO WAY Subway” Movement on Facebook

Join the “Boycott Nike for Signing Michael Vick” Movement on Facebook

COPS comes to Orange Park, FL

Posted in Uncategorized on April 19, 2009 by chrisdurant2000

Okay, so I will lay it out for you as clearly as possible.   First, there are no moments nor glimpses of heroism on my part. Hard to believe I know, but in the blink of an eye decisions are made.   My decision was not about risk of peril or thumping some little thug, but rather it was a split second decision drenched in self preservation.   But not the kind you may initially believe.

It began Thursday night when we finally arrived at our hotel.   After running the luggage up to our room I took the cart back down to the lobby and stepped outside for a stealthful smoke.   (Florida is about as facist as California when it comes to the enjoyment of tobacco.)

 I had strolled around the corner of the building and was nearing the pool area.   As I turned the corner to the pool, I see this “kid” barreling towards me at full throttle screaming “GET OUT OF THE WAY!!”.   In an instant a barage of snapshots flashed with a series of mental deductions:   1.) Kid running towards me  2.) Why is he running? I just came from the lobby… nothing going on in there.   3.) 5’7″, light colored short hair, faded blue jeans, oversized black or dark navy hoodie   4.) Must just be some goofy kid playing cops and robbers with his friends   5.) Cops and robbers?   6.) Oh shit, he has a gun…

As the last realization sank in, the kid blew past me with only minimal “brushing” contact between us.   No sooner than he was past me, he was across the short parking lot and hopping the fence to the next property.   Immediately an unmarked Clay County car speeds up with the officer jumping out, looking at me and the pursuing on foot.   I watched momentarily as the cop began to close in on his prey.

Then remembering my Dad was moving the car (to the opposite side of the hotel) I began to work that way hoping that he had not encountered this little punk.  Back out front, I saw my father walking through the lobby.   Seeing me he came out to join.   At this point Clay County patrol cars are ALL over the area.   Strobes and spotlights flashing and shining in every direction in an attempt to locate the kid’s partner/get-a-way driver. 

With Dad safe and sound I headed back towards my original spot to talk with one, then two, then four other CC deputies about what I saw.   Leading them to where the kid jumped the fence, we found the magazine from his Glock .40.   Apparently the knucklehead had inadvertantly hit the magazine release button when he was going over the fence.   Dumbass!  

About 20 minutes later the original, pursuing officer returns to his car.   By now I have already written out my statement and had it sworn into evidence.   The kid is in custody and his accomplice is still at large. According to the officers, there had been a rash of robberies of hotel patrons coming back from the dog track and poker room down the street so the area was being watched – hence the unmarked car.   The gentleman who was almost the latest victim was only (temporarily) relieved of his cell phone.   Although the thought of being forced face down on the pavement with a .40 in your face was probably a more than a little unsettling.

Now… my dilemma:   Given the obvious size disparity between the two of us, I could have easily stepped in a little more and dropped my shoulder bouncing the kid into the fence at which time he would have most certainly lost his weapon.   It was truly a matter of less than 1.5 seconds to make this decision.   The gun was really not so much a thought as was the potential that this was merely some idiot kid playing.   Now, had a shouldered the little fella, knowing what I know now, I would have been touted as a hero by the hotel and the victim and yet scolded by my mother as insanely reckless.

The other possibility, NOT knowing what I know now, is that the kid was just that; a kid out too late playing.   At which point my “interference” could have been interpretted as assault with a potential law suit or criminal charges directed my way. 

Quite the crux, I’d say.

I finally made it back up to my room around 1:30am and had to retell the story to a disbelieving Nicole – wondering where in the Hell I’d been for the last hour and a half – I don’t think she was buying the initial text message. 

All in all, the hotel was very appreciative and apologetic although my room wasn’t comp’d and I didn’t get a obligatory gift basket – not sure what that was all about.

In retrospect, I wish I had leveled the little bitch!

“WIRED” is now Making its way through the Festival Circuit

Posted in Screenwriting, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2009 by chrisdurant2000

 

 

Albert Einstein once said:  “Reality is merely an illusion…”  Georgetown student, Benjamin Roberts is now living two realities.

After purchasing an obscure book on Philosophy and Human Paradoxes, Ben finds himself immersed in a vivid nightmare that leaves him questioning his own existence and everything around him.  His only confidante becomes a psychiatrist who seems to share his fascination with the unanswerable theory.

Ben’s journey is a psychological thrill ride that takes you through the darkest depths of the brain and the epicenters of U.S. medical and military power where conspiracy theories are born and more often buried. 

Is it all just a very bad dream, or is something more sinister?

Chris Durant’s new screenplay “WIRED” brings the philosophical mysticism of the Matrix to the real world.

Submitted to several festivals, Durant is currently looking for agency representation for this and his other works.

Agencies may request a full copy of “WIRED” by emailing cdurant2000@gmail.com.

The Death of “Atlanta Homicide”

Posted in Atlanta Investigations:HD, Screenwriting with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 22, 2008 by chrisdurant2000

As most of you know, I became involved with the start up TV show “Atlanta Homicide” (later known as “Atlanta Investigations:HD/ AI:HD”) back in December of 2007.  The premise in its origins was a crime drama set in Atlanta and like most others in this genre it attempted to balance the character stories of the principal actors with the drama of solving crime.

After working on nine episodes – five of which actually aired (on ColoursTV), one currently in post-production, and three others that seem closer to a beginning than an ending, I have decided to leave the show and have terminated my relationship with the overall project.  This is something I feel is unfortunate and I that regret must come to pass but is for the betterment of my career.

Sources inside the AI:HD camp have reported me being labeled a “Narcissistic, Ego-driven, ass*!&%” which, although probably not that far from the truth, still saddens me because of my prior commitment to the show.

From day one on the set of AI:HD I was prepared.  I stayed as long as I was needed and went above and beyond my role as simply an actor on the set.  Many times I had to re-write scripts on set so that they made sense.  I have re-written lines for people so that they flowed better and were easier to deliver.  I have bought food.  I have catered and hosted a network night when one of the producers and co-creators of the show could not be there and the other one showed up 30 minutes before the event was over.  I supplied props for myself and others.  I knew what day in the script we were shooting and usually had to educate others on what wardrobe went with what “day”, etc.  And ultimately I have waited – countless hours on the co-creators/director/cinematographer and other cast members who would show up when it was convenient for them – at times up to 3 and 4 hours late, leaving those who were on time to wait.

So why did I leave you ask?

I took this show and this project very seriously – as I do every one that I work on.  My reputation speaks volumes about who I am and my character on and off the set.  I am a professional and act as such.  I cannot say the same about many of the others involved with AI:HD.  When the co-creators and primary producers don’t treat this as an absolute priority and a professional endeavor, others will not either.   That is where I feel AI:HD is now.

Overall there is a total lack of communication and follow up.    Planning and organization are non-existent.  This has to change.  Casting is done on the fly and as a result we ended up unable to complete episodes because now “so and so” lives out of state, etc.  There are currently 3 unfinished episodes that involved me – one which we began filming in FEBRUARY!  We did not have production meetings, table reads or even call sheets, all of which I feel are critical to planning and ultimately executing a successful episode filming.

On my last day on set, our scheduled call time was 10:30 a.m.  I got a call at 10 a.m. indicating that the call time had been moved to 11:30 a.m.  Upon arriving at the studio on time, I found the parking lot completely empty – no crew, no cast, other than me!   A phone call later, I found out that the director was enroute and would be there with in 15 minutes and our producer/cinematographer would be there shortly (undefined).  At 12:15 p.m. the director showed up and shortly there after assorted background cast members began to trickle in.    At 1:05 p.m. the producer/ cinematographer finally showed up and immediately left again.   Fortunately I was out in the parking lot detailing my car, so at least I was somewhat occupying my time.   Now by 2:30 p.m. I was done with the car and getting a little impatient.  My ultimatum to the director was if we were not shooting by 3:00 p.m., I was leaving.  Everyone involved knew that I had to leave no later than 5:00 p.m.  Finally at 2:55 our producer/ cinematographer showed up.  None of the equipment was set up and we were still waiting on my partner for this episode.  It was doubtful if not impossible that we could get anything filmed prior to my 5:00 p.m. cut time.  So after several discussions I left.   I should point out at this point that I had passed on a well paid, modeling assignment to dedicate my day to filming for AI:HD.

The following day I was fortunately able to perform the second half of the shoot that I missed on Saturday (for the remaining half of the total compensation).  Afterwards, my phone began blowing up with calls from cast and crew members of AI:HD asking me to come to the studio to film.  I refused.   After the final straw of Saturday’s absolute waste of time, everything else really came into perspective.  And as such I realized that I could not commit any more time to this project unless steps were taken to address the many production downfalls (see above) that had become the norm.  To date, I still do not believe that these opportunities for improvement and paramount needs have been addressed.

To those actors and crew members still working on AI:HD, I wish them the very best.  I would not have spent the amount of time and energy I did if the show was not something I believed in.  However, it was just time for me to move on.

Now, as far as the promised compensation of copy and credit I would issue this warning to anyone associated with AI:HD as well as independent directors and producers.  When you indicate “COPY and CREDIT” as the only compensation, it is your absolute responsibility to provide that to your actors.  And actors, it is your absolute right to request, repeatedly, even if you have to demand it from your director/producer.

With AI:HD I had to write numerous emails requesting that my IMDB.com (Chris Durant on IMDB.com ) page be updated before they finally were.  That takes care of the credit portion, so how about copy?  Beg, borrow, steal and maybe with a little ardent encouragement you’ll get it.  I even went so far as to give a pack of 50 DVRs to our co-creator/director/cinematographer.  I am still waiting on two of the finished and aired episodes.

Now this brings us to the present day:

As many of you know I had written a script titled “Vendetta” for the show that delved into why my character, Detective Winslow, was who he was and why he acted the way that he did.  I already had 95% of the roles cast.  I had the bulk of the locations secured.  I had the prop list compiled with the vast majority of them being supplied by me – including visual and graphic effects.  I had a world renowned producer prepared to score the episode.  And as important to the production planning process as I feel they are, I had undated call sheets prepared so that during our preproduction meeting/table read we could plan out our shoot days based on everyone’s availability all at once.  Many of the people I had worked with in putting this together were leery to commit knowing the (not so good) reputation of AI:HD but also knowing me, they agreed to participate as a favor to me.  I guess they’re off the hook now.  I wanted to use this opportunity to showcase AI:HD to those who had heard not so good things about this production and show them where we were had come to now.   Or not!

As a result of my departure from AI:HD I am rewriting “Vendetta” into a short and also a feature length film to be shot by my newly formed production company – Twisted Window Productions.  So thanks for the inspiration.

Chris Durant ®

“Atlanta Homicide” becomes “Atlanta Investigations:HD”

Posted in Atlanta Investigations:HD with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2008 by chrisdurant2000

Atlanta Homicide – Atlanta Investigations HD

 AIHD Chris Durant & Kal CauthenAtlanta Homicide News

Atlanta Homicide is changing its series name to Atlanta Investigations HD (Homicide Division) as it prepares for Colours TV broadcast in July.

The show features stars Kal Cauthen as Detective Bryce, Chris Durant as Detective Winslow, and Angelina Cortez as Detective Wilmore.

CoLours can be found in all 50 states in the top 100 TV markets, in front of over 18 million television households. Find them on EchoStar/Dish Network channel 9407 and on local cable affiliates, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. CoLours’ technical information is Satellite Intelsat Americas 13, Transponder 6. CoLours also features an online presence. Go to our web site at www.colourstv.org for more information.

Atlanta’s “Cold Cases” get TV Treatment

Posted in Atlanta Investigations:HD with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2008 by chrisdurant2000

Chris Durant, Angelina Cortez, Hattie Lemon on the set of AIHD

This article was originally printed in the Atlanta Journal Constitution and on AccessAtlanta.com.

CRIME/TELEVISION

Atlanta’s ‘cold cases’ get TV treatment
New cable series based on true crimes filming in Roswell


The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 06/20/2008  

The idea is to take crimes from the streets and put a fictional spin on them to produce an Atlanta cop drama that will alter the image of this city the way the HBO series “The Wire” has reimagined Baltimore.

But there are problems on the set of “Atlanta Investigations: HD,” a shoestring production that, at this moment, is shooting an episode in an abandoned gym without air-conditioning on a boiling June afternoon that makes everyone on the set feel like something in the oven for dinner.

PHIL SKINNER / AJC
Actress Angelina Cortez gets ready for shooting scenes of ‘Atlanta Investigations: HD’, a new TV series based on real Atlanta homicide investigations.
 

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The generator powering the lights just ran out of gas. Carl Millender, the show’s creator and video camera operator, groans. “I only brought enough gas to run it [the generator] two and a half hours,” he tells the actors.

He pauses, thinks a second.

“Everybody move over by the window — we’ll shoot it there.”

If there’s an instinct vital to survival in the industry of TV on the cheap it’s knowing how to adapt. Millender, 38, the owner of Alpharetta-based StarMaxx Media, has honed that instinct in nine years of trying to survive on the margins of television production in Atlanta.

“They say we’re supposed to shoot an episode on a budget of $100,000,” he says of the show, which will begin airing on The Dish satellite network Thursday. “We’re more like $20,000.”

There’s no disguising the cut corners from viewers used to watching slick cop productions such as “CSI” or “Law & Order,” which carries an average per episode production budget of $4 million.

In early episodes of “Atlanta Investigations: HD,” the lighting, camera work and sound are patchy. And for actors — who are unpaid until the series airs — the work has been a test of mettle.

“We’ve been at both extremes shooting in this gym,” says Chris Durant, 34, who plays strictly-by-the-books Detective Stephen Winslow. “In January we were freezing. The beginning of June we’re sweating our tails off.”

Yet, says Millender, “Atlanta Investigations: HD” (the HD stands for homcide division) is about more than just making a hit show.

About 90 shows and series have been shot in Atlanta in the last 35 years, most recently Tyler Perry’s “House of Payne,” but “Atlanta Investigtions: HD” would be the first dramatic series set and shot in the city with Atlanta in the name.

And that’s huge, Millender says.

“Atlanta is the Mecca of the South, and the center of the music industry, but there’s no TV show ever been based here, and there’s no TV industry here. This is what we’re trying to do. And we’ve been getting a lot of help.”

And they’ve needed it. Millender and co-creator and director Hattie Lemon know their way around the TV business. And they’re doing what they can to juice the show’s appeal, such as casting celebrity guest appearances (comic Arnez J) and hiring Michael Moore — who produced music for episodes of “The Sopranos” — to write the show’s high-energy theme.

But, when it came to running even a fictional homicide division, Millender and Lemon were complete tyros.

They asked for help in a most unexpected place: The Andrew Young Foundation. Millender got in touch with former Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s brother, Walter, an Atlanta dentist who works with the Foundation, and told him he was trying to produce a cop show in Atlanta that would help solve crimes and give the city a lot of publicity.

Within two days Walter Young arranged a meeting with local police chiefs. Over dinner at the Four Seasons restaurant, Millender bounced his ideas off Atlanta Police Chief Richard J. Pennington, DeKalb Chief Terrell Bolton and former Atlanta chief and current Clayton County Commission Chairman Eldrin Bell.

Bolton, for one, told the producer Millender he should change the name of the show, which was originally titled “Atlanta Homicide,” recalls Millender. “He said that wasn’t the right image for the city.”

With Pennington’s blessing, Millender met with the head of the Atlanta Police Department’s homicide division, Lt. Keith Meadows, who watched one of the early episodes and offered advice.

“I thought it was pretty good, though you could tell it was low budget,” said Meadows, who teaches a crime scene class in the department’s Citizens Academy. “But they had a lot of unrealistic parts I told them they needed to fix.”

Meadows told Millender and Lemon, who attended this crime scene class, to clean up the language — “Homicide detectives don’t talk in the kind of slang they did” — and put coats and ties on the crime scene detectives.

“Their investigators were wearing T-shirts and bandannas,” Meadow said. “That’s a no-no. If an investigator of mine showed up like that I’d send him home.”

The show now has a full-time cop consultant and, for script ideas, a pipeline to Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue’s “Rewards Office,” which offers money to help solve hard-to-crack crimes.

At the end of each episode, which are fictionalized versions of the real-life crimes, viewers are asked to come forward if they have evidence in the case.

“It’s a great show, good for the police and good for the city,” says Billy Johnson, a specialist in charge of extradition and rewards in the governor’s office who is also on the board of the Georgia Film, Video and Music Office.

The show is fictionalizing: gang-related drive-by shootings in Clayton County in 2005; a 2007 triple murder in Powder Springs; the case of a woman missing from LaFayette since 2007; and the case of a newborn found dead and abandoned in 2007.

All that will come to naught if the show doesn’t catch on with viewers, concedes Arthur Thomas Sr., VP of Colours TV, which is syndicating the show on The Dish satellite network. Locally, the show will air the evening of July 3 on The Dish at Channel 9407.

But the show’s appeal may be its lack of polish.

“It’s got a great cast, real stories, and a kind of gritty indie feel to it,” says Thomas. “If it’s a good story, people will accept the production values. And I think Atlanta is hungry for a show about Atlanta.”

Character Bio – Detective Stephen “Step” Winslow

Posted in Atlanta Investigations:HD, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 20, 2008 by chrisdurant2000

ATLANTA INVESTIGATIONS:HD – Star Maxx Media

  
 

 

Character Bio: Detective Stephen “STEP” Winslow    

    

Name: Stephen “Step” Winslow

Age:     34

Height:   6’1”       Weight:  180lbs     Build:  Athletic

Hair:     Brown     Eyes:  Hazel

Marital Status:   Single

Religion:  Baptist

Father:   John Winslow, VP with local bank

Mother:  Carol Winslow, Retired Elementary School Teacher

Brother:  Wade Winslow, Major, United States Marine Corps, Pentagon

Education:

            High School:   Pace Academy, Atlanta, Georgia

            College:           United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD

 

Military:   United States Marine Corps, Captain, Force Recon, Bronze Star, Operation ENDURING FREEDOM

Atlanta Police Department:

·         Academy – Top of his class – 6 months

·         Patrol, Zone 2 – 18 months

·         Training Group – 24 months

·         SWAT – 36 months

·         Homicide – 6 months – current

 

Background:

Stephen “STEP” Winslow grew up in an affluent, upper middle class family in the Buckhead suburbs of Atlanta.   The youngest of two sons, Step looked up to and seemed to idolize his older brother, Wade.  The boys learned their values in a firm, yet loving household.  John (a VP with a local bank) and Carol (retired school teacher) provided excellent role models for the two boys.

 

Step attended and graduated from the prestigious Pace Academy in the heart of Buckhead.  And then followed in his brother’s footsteps and was accepted into the United States Naval Academy.  After graduating from Annapolis, Step received his commission in the United States Marine Corps.  He continued to follow Wade’s lead and joined Force Reconnaissance and served five (5) years in the Corps including a deployment to Afghanistan.

 

After being Honorably Discharged from the Marine Corps, Step returned to Atlanta and against the wishes of his parents joined the Atlanta Police Department.  Top in his academy class, Step went on to work patrol in Zone 2 for 18 months before moving into the training group where he served as a Firearms Instructor specializing in Tactical Pistol, Shotgun and Patrol rifle, Basic Weapons Handling as well as Taser and “Force on Force” training for officers and SWAT.  Still longing for the action of the Marine Corps, Step joined SWAT and served on the team for three (3) years before passing his detective’s exam and moving into his current role in Atlanta’s Homicide Division.

 

As the newest addition to the division, many of the other detectives are still feeling Step out.  A private person who seems to keep to himself off the job, Winslow is seen as a bit of a loner and is often thought of as arrogant because of his no-nonsense demeanor; a stereotype which has been further solidified by his refusal to take lip from ANYONE including his superiors who seem to look the other way at times.

 

His morals are beyond reproach and he is a “strictly by the book” officer/investigator.